Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for August, 2013

 

 

 

In the Summer 2013 Gospel Project, Lesson 12, the following quote by Robertson McQuilkin appears:

“The more I know [Christ], the more I love Him. The more I love Him, the more I obey Him. The more I obey Him, the more I become like Him. The more I become like Him, the better I know Him. The better I know Him, I love Him the more. And the more I love Him, I reach a new level of likeness to Him.”

I think better in diagrams and so remember concepts better. Additionally, I need to know what it looks like when it is happening including what part I have in the process and what part is applied to me. I hope the following helps you as well. The row of “looks like” bubbles are only a few examples that need expanded. You can click on the diagram to enlarge it.

Becoming Like Christ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

What might the following pictures have in common?

Digital Native

Digital Native

Cornwall Iron Furnace

Cornwall Iron Furnace

Busted Bus Replacement

Busted Bus Replacement

The Angle

The Angle

Flood Remnant!?

Flood Remnant!?

Little Round Top

Little Round Top

General Longstreet

General Longstreet

Cabela's

Cabela’s

Stroll Forest and Glade

Stroll Forest and Glade

Painting on Turkey Tailfeathers

Painting on Turkey Tailfeathers

Proud Grandparents

Proud Grandparents

National Watch and Clock Museum

National Watch and Clock Museum

Firstborn Son

Firstborn Son

Reading Rocks

Reading Rocks

The indoor climbing wall in Reading is challenging! I bouldered, topropped, and even led one climb in nearly 4 hours of climbing. The pegboard climb was most challenging, using only arms to move pegs up a pegboard you are hanging from.      Surveying the history of time measurement and timepieces and how they work, the difference in time measurement by period and country, and displaying some amazing and rare examples, The National Watch and Clock Museum is a worthwhile destination.    Nature art we saw at an art show, I realized, is most amazing and best when it best copies the beauty God instilled in nature. He is the Ultimate Artist we all try to emulate.    It is quite the sales strategy to make your store a museum for what your customers love best. Cabela’s draws people in to their museum of mounted large mammals and fish tanks so they are near outdoor equipment they sell.                    The High Water Mark of the Confederacy occurred at this battlefield. Do you know which one it is?     The Cornwall Iron Blast Furnace clearly details the importance of iron/steel in our history, the process of mining it and producing iron stock, and the importance of this particular Furnace and to American history.  Electrical work provides a consistent living. You can’t imagine us never needing electricians.    What these pictures have in common is our visit to see our grand-babies, family, and sightsee along the way. Adding also a play called “Acts, the Three Man Show” and two church services with excellent preaching, it was a whirlwind tour.

Read Full Post »

So,.?!

So what? So huge! So that we could. So, the conclusion is firm.

So much intonation, emotion, implication, connection, conclusion, in short, communication in so small a word. In reality the word may most usually be eliminated or another word substituted without harming the simple meaning of a sentence, but the passion of the argument or apathy conveyed will frequently be lost as well. As with any word used to elicit reaction, overuse so downgrades the word to cliche status as to make it sound like a nervous twitch of a self-absorbed, shallow person we find annoying.

So what’s my point? In writing or in speech use words with high energy infrequently but to best effect.*

In a more pedantic sense ‘so’ may be used as four parts of speech:

adverb- in a manner suggested

conjunction- in order that or with the result that

adjective- conforming to actual facts

pronoun- as specified or to suggest estimate

The definitions I am giving are minimal and devoid of example, both of which I leave to the reader to search out, but they do point to a common purpose for the word which is to intensify language by directing the hearer to intended cause and effect.

Another way of saying it is ‘so’ emphasizes the part of the meaning the user most wants you to understand. If I say, “I want it done”, the hearer only knows that I expect completion. But if I say, “I want it done so,” I intensify or focus on the mode of completion given in the instructions. “So, you want the blue one” does not simply affirm that I heard your desire, but additionally intensifies the fact that I understand why you say you want the blue one by connecting my acknowledgement back to your reasons. If a person, for effect, wants to heighten intensity of speech regularly for the purpose of attention, the actual result will be to lessen its intensity and any hearer’s interest in it. We have all heard this mode of operation in the person who uses a word like ‘awesome’ continually. “That was so awesome!” He is an awesome singer.” “That was an awesome shot. “He had an awesome hangnail.” You get the point.

This intensity of communication is somewhat lost in writing. A speaker may use intonation of voice tone or duration and gesturing and facial expression when using ‘so’ for maximum affect. The best that may be done in writing is to set the scene, convey the speaker’s attitude, or spell the word incorrectly: “sooooooo”.

With so much serious discussion of a word you may have previously overlooked, perhaps a silly, aeshetic perspective might do. One famous singer rang out that ‘so’ was “a needle pulling thread” followed by ‘la’ and preceeded by “a long, long way to run”. 

This blog entry is obviously offbeat and markedly different than my usual fare, but it reveals a fascination I have long held for language meaning and use. Semantics and etymology are topics I have explored occasionally. God has given us a way to communicate our deepest desires and He has given us His profound truths in His Word. We explore, record, and convey our surroundings, our insides, and our God through language. I am thankful to its Creator for its existence and desirous of every full and good use of it for His glory. With out exaggeration He is so worthy of its proper and thankful use.

 

 *Conversely, don’t become so introspective in your writing, and more so in your speech, as to become stilted and unnatural in you communication. Neither dumb-down nor flatten your vocabulary for the expectations of the audience. Write for the benefit of others, but write in a way that communicates your own ideas in your own way. Concise and clear are desirable traits but should not stiffle crativity and personal preference.

Read Full Post »